Originals Summary

Originals SummaryHow Non-Conformists Move The World

It is hard to be original when there is so much skepticism surrounding you.

In our summary of “Originals,” we show you how you can “package” your originality so others will see it. We cast a light on how tactical and strategic you have to be to thrive in an organization.

Who Should Read “Originals”? and Why?

In “Originals”, bestselling author, consultant and Wharton School professor Adam Grant raises the question of originality in the workplace. He explores the subject through a presentation of business histories, anecdotes and studies, that show how an original can thrive in an organization.

The truth is, even the most future-oriented companies are prone to resisting originality. Such is the case because the idea is not the only thing that is important – a good presentation is essential as well.

Grant motivates readers by giving them numerous examples of originals who somehow managed to turn their ideas into reality.

We recommend this book to all creative thinkers who still haven’t found a way to express their originality.

About Adam Grant

Adam Grant

Adam Grant is the Wharton School’s highest-rated professor and the youngest tenured faculty member. He is a former advertising director and a junior Olympian.

“Originals Summary”

Grant starts “Originals” by referring to the remarkable accomplishments of online eyeglass creator Warby Parker.

He shows his respect of the inventiveness of the organization’s founders, which were all Wharton students. The founders offered Grant an opportunity to contribute, before their launch.

However, he turned them down because Luxottica controlled over 80% of the eyeglass market. Hence, he did not feel that a group of students just starting out could profit.

Warby Parker, however, took a unique path. He allowed customers to buy glasses on the web and, if they did not like them, send them back.

Its launch was a great success.

The founders primarily thought they would offer three sets per day, yet they sold a year’s worth in less than a month and needed to create a 20,000 person waiting list.

Grant is genuine about his failure to invest. He observes it as his “worst financial decision” ever.

This book sprang from his wish to fathom his failure to grasp inventiveness when it was right in front of his nose.

Grant presents the delicacy of coalitions and shows that allied enemies can persevere through longer than one of the friendly back-stabbers, or how he calls them “frenemies.”

He furthermore utilizes the historical backdrop of the suffragette development as a significant example of the way adversaries concede their ill will but are willing to participate in common purposes.

Lucy Stone (1818-1893) was the first American woman to hold her original last name after marriage, the first Massachusetts woman to get a professional education and the first American that became a full-time speaker on women’s rights.

She published Woman’s Journal, which survived for half a century. Starting in 1853, Stone worked for 15 years with well known early women’s activists, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

However, in 1869, Stone experienced a severe split from Anthony and Stanton.

They opened rival associations and published rival newspapers. After some time, Anthony and Stanton “wrote Stone out” of their coverage of the historical backdrop of women’s journey for the vote.

Grant reports that the issue that sundered Anthony and Stanton from Stone was African-American suffrage.

Anthony and Stanton figured it is out of line to give dark men a chance to vote when white women could not, so they did not accept suffrage for colored men. Furthermore, Anthony regarded Stone’s support for giving dark men the right to vote as a disloyalty to the women’s cause.

They never got together again and fought until the very end.

Grant utilizes their story to indicate why you should know your partners and maybe even believe them less than your adversaries, who, at least will show consistent behavior.

He cautions readers that in a partnership, particularly in a business one, shared objectives are not sufficient to keep the partners together.

Shared values are great to have, but you additionally should concur on procedures and strategies.

Key Lessons from “Originals”

1.      Get Prepared for Skepticism
2.      Two Roads to Success
3.      Embrace Your Flaws

Get Prepared for Skepticism

Being original in the business world is difficult.

Many original people present themselves and the ideas they come up with in a way that undermines their position in the eyes of others. They do not understand that most of the people they contact will be a skeptic.

Original thinkers must be prepared to encounter skepticism and be ready to defeat it.

Two Roads to Success

Simply put, you can take two routes to success: originality or conformity.

Conformity is being like everyone else.

Originality, on the other hand, is not merely having fresh ideas. That is only the beginning. To be original, you have to fight to bring those ideas into life.

Embrace Your Flaws

As we already discussed, people will regard you with skepticism and cynism. Most of the time the listeners to your pitchers will stand ready to attack. You will not get much encouragement from them. On the contrary, they will try to beat you down using every flaw they can find.

Originals are aware of it. So, to stay protected, embrace your flaws and explain to them to anyone else can. Mentioning only positive sides to people raises their skepticism.

Because, in the end, we all know that nothing is perfect, don’t we?

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“Originals” Quotes

In the deepest sense of the word, a friend is someone who sees more potential in you than you see in yourself, someone who helps you become the best version of yourself. Click To Tweet Argue like you’re right and listen like you’re wrong. Click To Tweet Practice makes perfect, but it doesn’t make new. Click To Tweet Being original doesn’t require being first. It just means being different and better. Click To Tweet To become original, you have to try something new, which means accepting some measure of risk. Click To Tweet

Our Critical Review

Most of the business authors usually provide exercises and workbooks at the end of each chapter, or they offer summarized steps that readers can take to practice what they learned.

However, Grant takes a fresh, original approach to giving readers the needed tools, by giving direct and workable guidance at the end of his captivating book “Originals”.

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Option B Summary

Option B SummaryFacing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy

There comes a time in life, when you or someone you know suffers from a devastating loss.

What do you say? How do you offer your support?

How do you move on with your life if that person is you?

In our summary of “Option B,” we answer all of these questions through the story of Sheryl Sandberg and her loss – recovery.

Who Should Read “Option B”? and Why?

Sheryl Sandberg, a successful and happy woman, watched her life crumble into pieces when her husband Dave Goldberg died while they were vacationing in Mexico.

Going through the loss and helping their children deal with the sadness were the toughest challenges that she ever encountered in her life.

After coming out of the crisis, she decided, along with her co-author Adam Grant, to document some of the most personal moments of her journey through grief, and in such a way share everything that she had learned about coping with loss.

We recommend “Option B” to everyone, since everyone needs to find the right way to receive and give support during a crisis.

About Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant

Sheryl SandbergSheryl Sandberg worked in the US Treasury Department, and was a vice president of global online sales and operations at Google, before becoming the COO of Facebook. She is the author of “Lean In“.

Adam GrantAdam Grant is the Wharton School’s highest-rated professor and the youngest tenured faculty member. He is a former advertising director and a junior Olympian.

“Option B Summary”

We have all suffered or will at some point in time experience some devastating loss. However, feeling such loss must not stop our lives from functioning.

We cannot stop time; we cannot stop the world. Life goes on everywhere around you, no matter what happens to you, so you do not have the luxury just to stay away from everything. You have to learn how to cope, and let life flow the way it was moving before.

When Sheryl Sandberg suffered such a loss herself, she realized that she needed to find a way to cope with the seemingly unbearable sorrow, because she needed to care for her children.

Facing such challenge made her create a list of strategies that would help people weather the tragedy.

In “Option B” she shares the lessons she learned regarding giving and receiving comfort.

She categorized her insights in nine lessons for moving forward, which we cover in the key lessons below.

Key Lessons from “Option B”:

1.      Realize that “grief is a demanding companion.”
2.      Beware the “three P’s.”
3.      Name the elephant in the room.
4.      Try not to ask, “Is there anything I can do?” – Just do it.
5.      Have a go at journaling and acknowledge “little wins.”
6.      Parlay resilience into “post-traumatic growth.”
7.      “Take things back” from your loss.
8.      Respect children’s unique sensibilities
9.      Acknowledge that you can learn how to love again.

Realize that “grief is a demanding companion.”

Eleven years after they married, Sheryl Sandberg and Dave Goldberg left their two kids with their grandparents and went on a vacation in Mexico, to go to their friend’s 50th birthday celebration.

On Friday evening, Goldberg decided to go to the gym.

When he did not rejoin their gathering, Sandberg and Goldberg’s brother discovered him lying on the floor of the gym, with pools of blood under his head.

They did CPR and called an ambulance, but the situation was already past the point of no return.

Sandberg felt the deepest pain in her life.

Her friend, psychologist Adam Grant, consoled her telling her that she could find a way to recuperate more quickly, reinforce her strength and push anguish to run its course faster.

He guaranteed she would feel happiness again.

Weeks after Goldberg’s passing, she saw a father-kid activity coming up on the logbook. Since Goldberg was no longer there, she thought of an “Option B”: having somebody “fill in for Dave.”

At the point when Option A is not accessible, Option B is your only choice.

Beware the “three P’s.”

Therapist Martin Seligman reports that three propensities block people’s recuperation from hardships:

1) “Personalization” is the conviction that it is all your fault

2) “Pervasiveness” is the conviction that the event will negatively affect everything else in your life

3) “Permanence” is the conviction that things will never show signs of improvement.

Individuals who avoid the three P’s adapt better.

Name the elephant in the room.

After Goldberg’s death, Sandberg was often shocked when colleagues did not ask how she was doing. She acknowledges with empathy that although most grieving people want to voice their feelings, people tend to avoid the subject of death.

Psychologists call this avoidance the “mum effect.” Often, many who want to express sympathy do not know how.

Feeling lonely one night, Sandberg bravely posted on Facebook that instead of asking “How are you?” – a routine question often posed without thinking – people should ask, “How are you today,” to show that they understand the daily up-and-down struggle of coping with tragedy.

The reaction to the post was warm and positive. Strangers shared stories; friends began to talk openly and express empathy.

Try not to ask, “Is there anything I can do?” – just do it.

Instead of asking people if they need something, just do it. Holding out a helping hand encourages people regardless of whether they asked for help or not. The worst thing you can do is disappear.

Have a go at journaling and acknowledge “little wins.”

Recording small everyday triumphs supports your self-confidence, and helps you cope better. Focus on the positive, no matter how insignificant it may seem.

Parlay resilience into “post-traumatic growth.”

There are different types of people out there. Some people suffer from PTSD or depression after trauma, while others bounce back and become stronger after a loss.

“Take things back” from your loss.

Do not waste your life by shutting happiness out. Rediscover fun by taking things away from your grief: do the things that are interesting alone or with someone else, even though you may have done them with your late loved ones before.

Respect children’s unique sensibilities

Sandberg thought that her children would suffer significantly from losing their father.

However, children have a different coping mechanism as opposed to adults, and as a result, can recover more easily.

Take care of your children by listening to them, valuing their ideas, and letting them shape their lives.

Acknowledge that you can learn how to love again.

After losing a loved one, letting yourself look for affection someplace else can be a problem. Dating can make you feel guilty. People that once knew you paired with someone may also find it troublesome to picture you with someone else.

However, you have to allow yourself to feel love again. Moving on does not mean that you stop respecting and caring for your late partner. It means you allow yourself to live.

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“Option B” Quotes

Option A is not available. so let's just kick the shit out of Option B. Click To Tweet Let me fall if I must fall. The one I become will catch me. Click To Tweet Each one of us is more than the worst thing we've ever done. Click To Tweet Life is never perfect. We all live some form of Option B. Click To Tweet As we get older, we define happiness less in terms of excitement and more in terms of peacefulness. Click To Tweet

Our Critical Review

In “Option B” Sandberg and Grant study how other people deal with trauma and, how some of them even found a new purpose in life through post-traumatic growth.

They furthermore explore the qualities of recovery and resilience and give advice and recommendations that anyone could use when in need of support, consolation, and finding your way back to happiness.

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Give and Take Summary

Give and Take Summary

Why Helping Others Drives Our Success

In this world, there are a few types of people: givers, takers, and those in between.

In our summary of Adam Grant’s “Give and Take” we will cover the definitions of givers, takers, and matchers, and we will show you how you can recognize them.

We will also conclude which one is best suited for success.

So read on and find out your type.

Who Should Read “Give and Take”? and Why?

You may have the urge to underestimate “Give and Take,” but that would be a mistake.

If we decided to explain this book’s premise shortly, we would conclude that it is good to be nice to people, it is better to give than take, et cetera.

However, that is not all there is to Grant’s book.

He does not only present his theory – but he also backs it up with empirical data. If you look more deeply into the information he gives you, you will end up having a superior way to conduct business and climb the success ladder.

We recommend “Give and Take” to managers, leaders and all readers that want to make the world a better place.

About Adam Grant

Adam GrantAdam Grant is the Wharton School’s highest-rated professor and the youngest tenured faculty member. He is a former advertising director and a junior Olympian.

“Give and Take Summary”

Every time you step out of the door and interact with someone else, you decide the type of person you will be.

There are two options: you can be a giver, a taker, or a matcher.

What do these categories mean?

A giver is someone who always puts the interests of others first, and does what is best for them. Takers take care of their interests and let others take care of themselves. Matchers can be both, or, in other words, treat others as they treat them.

What do you think, who will most likely end up at the bottom of the ladder to success?

It is the givers.

However, the givers occupy the highest levels of the ladder as well. Hence, they fill the top and the bottom, with the middle full of matchers and takers.

Giving matches the core values of many cultures and religions. Furthermore, its importance grows as the economy transforms.

Just think back a few generations. Then, people worked mostly independently, no matter the industry they were in. Nowadays, on the other hand, people increasingly collaborate and work in teams.

When it comes to working in teams, giving works better. Giving is also more suited for service businesses, a sector which is currently in expansion.

The networks that givers, takers, and matchers develop are different in their core.

Takers network actively. They can be charming, but care to use their charm only on more important or influential people. As they climb the organizational hierarchy, they start to mistreat their subordinates. They present themselves as better than others, by sharing only the information that serves their good image. As you can notice, their networks are mostly artificial and are bound to decay over time. This is the case because people lose their patience with constant takers.

Matchers (as you can suppose by their name) try to match their behavior with that of people in their environment. In the beginning, they treat takers well, but after takers betray them, they get ready for punishment. Matchers create networks based on fairness and reciprocity.

We have nothing against reciprocity, but when you deploy it as a way of functioning in your network, it has drawbacks.

For instance, if you give to someone who functions mainly of reciprocity, that person will assume that the gifts come along with some request.

Matchers concentrate on the immediate benefits attached to all transactions.

Key Lessons from “Give and Take”

1.      Giving Through Teaching
2.      How Givers and Takers Communicate
3.      Give and Survive

Giving Through Teaching

Teaching shows the genuine power of giving.

Great performers or athletes are not born “great.” They do not demonstrate the best potential or the highest intelligence from the get-go in their lives.

Many develop after they get coaching from a giving educator who inspires and motivates them.

Furthermore, giving managers observe the potential outcomes in their employees. At the point when givers hire people, they can commit errors as promptly as takers. They can pick the wrong prospects and be tricked by appearances.

Takers tend to stick to their decisions because admitting a bad choice makes them look inadequate.

Givers, on the other hand, value the workers they picked, yet move them to different positions or let them go if that is what’s best for the organization.

How Givers and Takers Communicate

You can impact others using dominance or prestige. When you establish dominance, other individuals consider you to be powerful and authoritative. On the off chance that you earn prestige, you become influential since people admire you.

These two alternatives spring from your style of correspondence.

Takers pick strength and dominance. They stand up for themselves and underline pride and achievements.

However, when you gain dominance, other people lose it.

Give and Survive

Being a giver, and using the qualities of giving, does not guarantee you success.

In fact, you can wind up depleted with little or nothing to show for everything you have done.

So, be a giver, but do not let takers exploit you. It is understandable that you wish to see others make it. However, you should not put others’ interests in front of your own.

You have to keep a certain level of self-interest.

Successful givers show balanced behavior. At the same time they act based on their need to see others prosper, balanced with reaching their own goals.

Some givers make a mistake and become other-centered to an unhealthy degree. They give up without a limit and become involved in pathological altruism.

Givers are in danger of burnout.

Exhausted givers notice both physical and emotional problems. However, taking a break is not the “medicine” that will revitalize them. They need more giving, in the right context. In other words, the best medicine is the realization that their actions are significant.

“Give and Take” Quotes

As Samuel Johnson purportedly wrote, “The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good. Click To Tweet The more I help out, the more successful I become. But I measure success in what it has done for the people around me. That is the real accolade. Click To Tweet Success doesn’t measure a human being, effort does. Click To Tweet Being a giver is not good for a 100-yard dash, but it’s valuable in a marathon. Click To Tweet If we create networks with the sole intention of getting something, we won’t succeed. We can’t pursue the benefits of networks; the benefits ensue from investments in meaningful activities and relationships. Click To Tweet

Our Critical Review

The only thing we have to say regarding “Give and Take” is that it is not only interesting: it is also useful in all kinds of situations.

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