Top Business Books

Wikipedia defines business as “an organization that provides goods and services for human needs.” It’s a simple definition for a complex set of processes, which encompass everything from an original idea, through an effective management structure to a maximizing-profits strategy.

And we have them all: the basics and the classics, the biographies and the big company histories, the why and wherefores of being an entrepreneur, a leader, and an investor, and the because of-s and the how-to-s of dealing with a crisis.

Consequently, it’s only natural that this list is a compilation of few other of our top books lists. But, we couldn’t resist to include few titles which – since we decided for a maximum of 15 of the best business books per list – we had no choice but to omit from our other booklists.

No need to buckle up: it’s going to be a lean ride!

#1. “The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don’t Work and What to do About it” by Michael E. Gerber

The E-Myth Revisited SummaryIf you want to start your own company, this book is all but a prerequisite. It’s basically a step-by-step guide, including not only essential tips and tricks, but also, much more importantly, numerous don’ts and why the hell would you-s.

In the cult classic “The E-Myth Revisited,” Michael E. Gerber takes you on a virtual journey from the nugget of an idea to your first successful small business. The book is dived in three parts: “The E-Myth and American Small Business,” “The Turn-Key Revolution: A New View of Business,” and “Building a Small Business That Works!”

And each of these parts includes few chapters which will carefully lead you through all the phases of a successful small business. Specifically, you’ll progress from entrepreneurial infancy (the technician’s phase) through adolescent help-getting pleas and comfort-zone-wrecking acts to developing mature in-depth manuals for each of the necessary business strategies.

“The E-Myth Revisited” aims to transform the unpredictability of the business world into a surefire method for success. Absolutely essential.

#2. “The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers” by Ben Horowitz

The Hard Thing About Hard Things SummaryAnother business 101 classic.

Ben Horowitz is an American investor and businessman, a regular blogger, a co-founder of the venture capital giant Andreessen Horowitz, and an all-around Silicon Valley legend.

In “The Hard Thing About Hard Things,” he shares his experiences and real-world-proof expertise on how to establish and run a startup. And he focuses on what others leave out. “A lot of people talk about how great it is to start a business,” says the blurb on the back cover, “but only Ben Horowitz is brutally honest about how hard it is to run one.”

And that brutal honesty comes in the form of a highly readable experience-based volume, adorned with – well, this is a first one – rap lyrics!

After all, if one of our investment gurus, Mark Spitznagel, can consider Bob Dylan an economic prophet, why shouldn’t Horowitz epigraph his first chapter with DMX’s “Who We Be”?

You’ll find many of those scattered throughout “The Hard Thing About Hard Things.” Now, who would have known that you could teach business with rap and hip-hop?

(Mental note: read “The 50th Law”; just in case.)

#3. “Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.” by Ron Chernow

Titan SummaryMoving on from the fundamentals classics to the classic business biographies. And is there a better place to start other than with the ultimate biography of a person whose surname has become a synonym for “wealth”?

When he died in 1937, John D. Rockefeller Sr. fell just two years short of becoming a centenarian. But, what he left behind was a business empire of mythic proportions. In fact, at his peak, Rockefeller controlled almost nine tenths of the oil in the United States, and was worth about one fiftieth of the U.S. GDP.

In other words, he amassed a fortune four times bigger than Bill Gates!

Safe to say, Ron Chernow couldn’t have chosen a better subject for a biography. And, in writing “Titan,” he got an unprecedented access to Rockefeller’s private papers! Since you’ll definitely want to pick up this book now, let us prepare you appropriately, by taking you back to Rockefeller’s times:

“Rockefeller stripped to the bone as never before! Read all about it! Read all about it!”

#4. “Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future” by Ashlee Vance

Elon MuskElon Musk Summary has the magnetism of a Hollywood superstar. And he’s at the frontline of the mastermind minority which is currently designing your future.

Just think about it: can you imagine being privileged enough to follow Nikola Tesla’s Twitter account?

Unique and brilliant, Elon Musk has built an image which guarantees that any book dedicated on his life and endeavors will be an instant bestseller. Even better when it’s authored by Ashlee Vance, a celebrated business author and columnist.

His “Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future” doesn’t disappoint in the least. It is thoroughly researched and full of exclusive content. Elon Musk has warned that It’s not independently fact-checked, but has endorsed it as a great book, nevertheless.

And when the man himself says that it’s good – who are we to judge otherwise?

#5. “Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike” by Phil Knight

Shoe Dog Summary“Shoe Dog” is the safest bridge we could think of between the essential business biographies/memoirs of the day and the best histories of the top companies in the world.

Because, this one’s a book written by Phil Knight, the co-founder and chairman emeritus of “Nike,” your beloved footwear maker. And it’s not about the “Nike” you know, but about how the “Nike” you know came to be.

So, don’t expect to find here your Jordans and Jameses, your Woodses and Federers!

But, do expect to find how an ordinary Portland accountant tricked the Japanese conglomerate Onitsuka Co. to establish a small Tiger shoes reseller called Blue Ribbon Sports. And, of course, how that became “Nike” – together with the wonderful stories about the naming and the choosing of the swoosh logo!

It’s engagingly written, wonderfully structured and brimming with between-the-lines practical advice. The best kind, really.

#6. “The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” by Brad Stone

The Everything Store SummaryPhil Knight is the 28th richest person in the world. Jeff Bezos, the founder of the company this book is dedicated on, is the richest. And Wikipedia has compiled a list of few references which claim that he’s on a track to become the wealthiest person in history.

Yes, maybe even beating the guy at #3!

Born into a middle-class family in Albuquerque, Jeff Bezos had the idea of starting a business company which will deliver books via mail. That was back in 1994. Few years into the venture, Bezos was visionary enough to see that this Internet bookstore can become “The Everything Store.”

And, soon enough, it did.

In 2013, that’s the phrase Brad Stone, a lauded technology journalist, chose for the title of his book chronicling Amazon’s rise. And his account was so terrific that “Financial Times” bestowed “The Everything Store” with the 2013 best business book award.

And what’s more, getnugget.co presented it with the ultimate honor: a place on its top 15 business booklist.

#7. “Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal” by Nick Bilton

Hatching Twitter SummaryThe rise and rise of Amazon was largely a one-man show. The story of Twitter, on the other hand – as the subtitle of our choice states – was a multi-person drama of money, power, friendship and betrayal.

Really: they should make a TV series out of it! If it’s based on Nick Bilton’s account, we can guarantee you hours and hours of cliffhangers and shocks, excitement and twists.

Praised for its novel-like qualities and the breadth of the research, “Hatching Twitter” has it all!

From a project gone wrong to a casual idea gone right; from a fellowship of four hackers – Ev Williams, Jack Dorsey, Biz Stone, and Noah Glass – to a startup with serious backup problems; and, finally, from constant inside power struggles to a multibillion-dollar business which has twice fired its founders.

Yes, we’ve read “Things a Little Bird Told Me,” Biz Stone’s take of the Twitter affairs. But, this one’s better.

#8. “Principles: Life and Work” by Ray Dalio

Principles SummaryWe really wanted to include this book in our top finance and investing books, but we didn’t really know which of those 15 books to drop. (Leave a comment if you do.)

So, we opted for a compromise, which meant that Ray Dalio’s “Principles” was one of the first books we wrote down under the “Top Business Books” title.

And here’s why.

In 1975, when Ray Dalio was merely 26, he founded an investment firm in his two-bedroom New York apartment. Today, at the age of 68, he is one of the 100 wealthiest people on this planet. And the firm, Bridgewater Associates, is probably the world’s largest hedge fund.

“Principles” is Dalio’s personal view on the matters. It includes hundreds of practical business lessons, all revolving around his three fundamental beliefs: “radical transparency,” “radical truth,” and “organizational dissent”.

Just like Dalio, “Principles” is unconventional and entertaining as hell. Where else, after all, would you find a suggestion to create trading “baseball cards” of your employees?

#9. “The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing” by Benjamin Graham

The Intelligent Investor SummaryWarren Buffet, the Oracle himself, says that “The Intelligent Investor” is “by far the best investing book ever written.” And that this book – and man, since he was his mentor – utterly “changed his life.”

Benjamin Graham is considered the father of “value investing.” And “The Intelligent Investor” is where he expounds his “value investing” philosophy most thoroughly and in a most readable manner. In fact, you can understand the gist of it by way of Graham’s favorite allegory, the one about Mr. Market.

There’s no need to describe it or delve in it further, because you have probably already heard it. Just like there’s probably no need to endorse “The Intelligent Investor” anymore than it already is by the first sentence of this review.

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#10. “Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street” by John Brooks

Business Adventures SummaryJohn Brooks died over quarter of a century ago, but his legacy as one of the best “New Yorker” contributors in history remains safe and sound to this day. Moreover, “Business Adventures,” his most popular book, is still considered one of the ultimate business classics.

As its subtitle implies, “Business Adventures” is an anthology of Brooks’ articles, a collection of twelve Wall Street stories. In principle, these cover much more monkey business, than actual business – but that’s exactly what makes them even more interesting.

In fact, we think that there’s no other book where you can read, side by side, a personal account of the rise of Xerox, and a behind-the-scenes narrative of the 1960s multi-million scandals at Ford and General Electric.

The reviews have our back: “Forbes” says it’s “vividly written,” and “Slate” calls it “superb.” But they all fade out in view of Bill Gates’ endorsement: “’Business Adventures’ remains the best business book I’ve ever read.”

#11. “Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future” by Peter Thiel

Zero to One SummaryWhat Bill Gates says about “Business Adventures,” Derek Thompson, writing for “The Atlantic” says almost verbatim about Peter Thiel’s “Zero to One.” And he furnishes the accolade with a sentence which neatly describes the best aspect of the book: a “lucid and profound articulation of capitalism and success in the 21st century economy.”

Peter Thiel – if you happen to be living on some other planet –  is the co-founder of PayPal, the first outside investor in Facebook, and one of the richest people in the world.

And in “Zero to One” he shares some of his insights about how the greatest entrepreneurs (yes, we have featured this book on that list as well) make large leaps – not from 1 to 1.1, but from 0 to 1.

From time to time, the discussion is a bit more abstract and enigmatic than you’d expect. But, then again, one of Thiel’s main ideas is that the startups which succeed are founded on secrets.

#12. “Capital in the 21st Century” by Thomas Piketty

Capital in the 21st Century Summary“Financial Times” best business book for 2014 and a top 15 economics book ever, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” is one of the most sobering business books you’ll ever read. A little publishing miracle, its English translation is the most sought-after and purchased book ever published by the Harvard University Press.

Thomas Piketty examines data from twenty different countries, going back to the 18th century, in an attempt to understand better the relationship between wealth and inequality. His conclusions may revolutionize how you – or anyone else, for that matter – think about business.

First of all, even though Marx wasn’t completely right, he was much more spot-on concerning how capitalism works than most. And secondly, not fixing inequality is bad for everybody’s business – in the long run.

The solution, in Piketty’s opinion, is progressive taxation. For better or for worse, our best tool to eliminate inequality.

#13. “Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System – and Themselves” by Andrew Ross Sorkin

Too Big to Fail SummaryPiketty was as good an introduction to our crises section of this list as any. And “Too Big to Fail” is undoubtedly the book we’d like to start this section with.

When it was published in 2010, it won the 2010 Gerald Loeb award for best business book. Additionally, it was named “the best book of the year” by respectable publications such as “The Economist” and “The Business Week.” And, finally, it was either shortlisted or longlisted by almost all other periodicals and newspaper of note.

A thriller of blockbuster proportions, “Too Big to Fail” is the book you’d want to read if you want to find out what was happening during the 2007-8 financial crisis. You can also watch the award-winning HBO film if you’d like, but, if you ask us, you shouldn’t skip Andrew Ross Sorkin’s bestseller under any circumstances.

Greed, ego, fear, self-preservation instincts – the business world has never looked more similar to a jungle than here!

#14. “Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco” by Bryan Burrough and John Heylar

Barbarians at the Gate SummaryAnd one more book-turned-successful-movie about corporate greed you’ll swallow in a single bite, savoring its bitter-sweet taste for a fairly long period.

In “Barbarians at the Gate”, Bryan Burrough and John Heylar take you on a journey deep inside the belly of the whale. In their case, the whale is RJR Nabisco, a former American tobacco and food conglomerate, and the belly is its leveraged buyout, at the time the highest in history.

Out-of-date only at first glance, this is an amazingly honest and profound account of a world of power struggles and aggressive business strategies. One that probably happens all around us today, because – even though companies and owners change, people hardly ever do.

“The Chicago Tribune” in its review wrote that “it’s hard to imagine a better story…” And, even more importantly, it went on “…and it’s hard to imagine a better account.”

#15. “Great by Choice: Uncertainty, Chaos, and Luck –Why Some Thrive Despite Them All” by Jim Collins and Morten T. Hansen

Great by Choice SummaryWe guess that you probably expected to find Jim Collins’ other famous book on this list, but since you can find it among the top 15 leadership books we’ve carefully selected, we thought that it wouldn’t harm to opt for “Great by Choice” here.

As you might already know, “Good to Great” ploughed deep to find the reasons which made some good companies turn great, as opposed to others who remained mediocre. Well, “Great by Choice” is another deep-research-based study of similar kind, this time focusing on an even more interesting question. Namely, why do some companies thrive in crisis, while others descend into mayhem?

In “Great by Choice,” Jim Collins and Morten T. Hansen reveal many reasons, while introducing one or two paradigm-shifters. And they prove that if you want a good business, you need to obsessively prepare for disaster, and never really care about exceeding your goals.

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Top Entrepreneurship Books

Want to become the next Elon Musk? Why don’t you first spend some time learning about how the one we’ve grown to adore came to be.

Because entrepreneurship is not as easy as you would think. And it doesn’t take only a good idea and a lot of courage to turn it into a functioning business. You’ll also need a lot of hard work, and even more knowhow.

But, why would you listen to us?

Here are few people you should. These are the best entrepreneurship books on the market!

#1. “Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy” by Joseph A. Schumpeter

Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy SummaryLet’s start with a bit of theory. And what better way other than with a book by the original entrepreneurship theoretician.

Joseph Schumpeter was a colorful character. He once promised to become the most influential economist in the world, the best horseman in Austria, and the greatest lover in Vienna. At the end of his life, he regrettably sighed that he failed at one: there were just too many good riders in Austria.

Jokes aside, Schumpeter was a genius thinker. He thought that economy is moved forward by innovation and change which create temporary monopolies which are creatively destructed afterward by another great entrepreneurship idea.

He also believed that capitalism will one day fall apart because of the success of these entrepreneurs. And because of the intellectual elite advocating a more humane society. He explained this in-depth in “Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy,” probably his most popular book.

#2. “The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich” by Timothy Ferriss

The 4-Hour Workweek SummaryLike it or not, you’re living in a capitalist society. And the chances are, you’ll live in one as long as you live. (That is, unless you want to move to Cuba or North Korea – which, let’s face it, is one of the worst ideas you may have in your life).

And in a capitalist society, you can choose; you’ll either work 8 hours a day, or be the one who gives orders to others to work for him. The latter kind is the one Timothy Ferriss talks about.

In his opinion – and he knows this from personal experience – working for (more than) a third of your life is even worse than moving to North Korea. So, he advises you to stop working so much. And work for only 4 hours. A week.

Yes, you’ve heard it right!

It’s not a fantasy. And “The 4-Hour Workweek” is a 50+ tips and tricks cheat sheet. So, what are you waiting for?

#3. “Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers” by Timothy Ferriss

Timothy FerrisTools of Titans Summary is a regular guest on these entrepreneurship booklists. And there’s a reason for that! An entrepreneur himself, he has built an empire around his patented 4-hour learning techniques.

“Tools of the Titans” might be an even better book than our previous entry. It’s as groundbreaking, but much more diverse and multifunctional. This may sound a bit strange, when you realize that most of Ferriss’ words inside this book are questions.

The mystery unravels when you hear that the answers are given by top actors, athletes, and scientists.

Yes, you’re right: “Tools of the Titans” is Tim Ferriss’s podcast in the form of a book!

And if you don’t know anything about “The Tim Ferris Show,” it would suffice here to say that it is the first business/entrepreneurship/interview podcast to pass 100 million downloads.

#4. “Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future” by Peter Thiel

Zero to One SummaryIf you don’t know him by now, Peter Thiel is the 3-billion-worth co-founder of PayPal and the first outside investor in Facebook.

So, safe to say, that whenever he’s trying to relate a message, it must be worthwhile to pay attention.

And in “Zero to One” he has quite the interesting idea. Namely, that most innovators are moving from 1 to 1.1, 1.2 etc. when the greatest entrepreneurs strive to make that coveted leap from 0 to 1.

In laymen’s terms, this means that if you’re planning to build the next multi-billion-dollar business, it would be a good idea to stop thinking in terms of new operating systems or different types of tablets. Because, the next Bill Gates and Steve Jobs out there is currently working in a totally different industry.

If you focus enough, that someone may be even you.

#5. “The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses” by Eric Ries

Eric RiesThe Lean Startup Summary has had his own fair share of startups behind him; some of them were successful, others spectacularly failed. He learned how to take lessons from the latter and implement them in the former. In fact, that’s why he’s currently where he is.

And that’s why “The Lean Startup” is one of the best books – if not the best – for every young entrepreneur out there. Its main idea is that startups don’t need to be such dangerous endeavors. And that efficiency can be acquired in a much faster manner than it is usually believed.

This is the background for his own patented lean startup methodology, which encourages regulated experimentation, validated learning, and iterative releases.

It worked for him. It should work for you as well.

#6. “The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future” by Chris Guillebeau

The $100 Startup SummaryIf someone came to you now and told you that you can change your life with merely $100, you’ll probably won’t believe him.

Yet, if that someone has identified and closely studied 1,500 individuals who built large businesses on a $100 original investment, you’ll probably think again.

Well, Chris Guillebeau Is the eccentric we’re talking about, and “The $100 Startup” is the book we gladly recommend. It is an in-depth study of the 50 most interesting $100 to $100,000 cases, coupled with a lot of practical advice and an almost manic enthusiasm.

The most valuable lesson?

You can earn money from your passion. You just need to find its most lucrative aspect.

#7. “Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike” by Phil Knight

Shoe Dog SummaryFor most of human history, knowledge was imparted only from one generation to the next. And, consequently (like “The Greatest Salesman in the World” taught us) the secrets of success were kept safe in small groups of elected people.

But in the 20th century, the world of money turned on its head. And, suddenly, some of the richest people alive started sharing their secrets with the world.

And when that happens, expect Phil Knight, the founder of “Nike,” to be the one who’ll keep the lest things to himself. Because, he’s not only one of the richest people in the world; he’s also one of the most generous philanthropists.

And “Shoe Dog” explains how he got to there. The beginning? A young man in a Japanese shoe factory, acting as a representative of a large American, when in fact he is its only employee and his father its only investor.

Already interesting? It only gets better.

#8. “Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future” by Ashlee Vance

Elon Musk SummaryElon Musk needs neither introduction nor hyperlinks.

One of the most unique entrepreneurs at the moment, he is described by Ashlee Vance, the author of “Elon Musk” as an amalgam of people as brilliant and as innovative as Thomas Edison and Howard, Henry Ford and Steve Jobs.

And he is fully dedicated to building the future of mankind – arguably, more than any other person alive.

Thorough researched and splendidly written, “Elon Musk” by Ashlee Vance is a book which transcends the world of entrepreneurship.

Much like Elon Musk himself, in fact.

#9. “Anything You Want: 40 Lessons for a New Kind of Entrepreneur” by Derek Sivers

Derek SiversAnything You Want Summary originally wanted to become a musician. However, he ended up being an entrepreneur in the music industry. You may already know the company he founded and subsequently sold, CD Baby.

The lesson?

Whatever you want to do, this is an age of entrepreneurs. And the sooner you realize this, the better for your future. However, it doesn’t hurt to work what your passionate about the most.

“Anything You Want” is Sivers’ very sincere, very concise (it’s less than a hundred pages) entrepreneurship manifesto. It compresses 10 years of experience in a one-hour read.

And yes – it’s a must read.

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#10. “The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth: Entrepreneurship for Weirdos, Misfits, and World Dominators” by Chris Brogan

The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth SummaryNo, we didn’t choose this book because of it’s catchy title! (Although, this would be a good place to say that we do love the title!) We chose it because its author is Chris Brogan, #1 social media power influencer in the world.

And because we’re down for whatever he’d say!

And in “The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth” he says that it’s not only true that non-conformists make the world go round; it’s also even truer that the more unusual and more eccentric these non-conformists are – the better it is for the progress of humanity.

The book is a wonderful rallying call to these guys. And if we are allowed to paraphrase it, it sounds something like this: “Misfits of the world – unite! You have created the world of today, you’ll shape the world of tomorrow as well!”

#11. “The Introvert Entrepreneur: Amplify Your Strengths and Create Success on Your Own Terms” by Beth Buelow

The Introvert Entrepreneur SummaryIn more than one way, “The Introvert Entrepreneur” may be read as a companion piece to Brogan’s “The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth.”

Much like Brogan, Beth Buelow is aware that the people who change the world are rarely conventional. However, she chooses to focus on those who are not merely misfits, but who are introverts as well.

And, at first sight, it’s a tough world for introverts out there! Business is a war, and it seems as if it’s a place where only loud and aggressive dominators can prosper.

However, Buelow shows that this doesn’t need to be the case. After interviewing many introverts who have flourished as entrepreneurs, she shows that you don’t need to lose your personality to be part of a success story.

And she explains how introverts can use their weakness to their benefit. So, what if the world is loud and chaotic!

#12. “The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future” by Steve Case

The Third Wave SummaryLet’s put it this way: if you’ve ever used dial-up internet, you should be thankful to Steve Case, the author of “The Third Wave.” Because, he is also the co-founder and one-time CEO of AOL.

And as Case convincingly argues, he was merely one of the many entrepreneurs who rode the first wave of the technological revolution. They were the pioneers, the people who paved the way for the internet by building the infrastructure.

The second wave came with Google, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and the rest. They used the existing infrastructure and exploited its possibilities. And brought to many people on the planet a new, virtual way to live their lives.

Steve Case’s book wouldn’t have been called “The Third Wave” if he hadn’t written a word or two about what follows next. Entrepreneurs of the world, lend us your ears: the Internet of Things. Enough with the virtual world. It’s time you transform the real one.

#13. “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Mastering the Inner World of Business” by Nanci K. Raphael

The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Mastering the Inner World of Business Summary“The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Mastering the Inner World of Business” is not your regular entrepreneurship book. Most of them are interested in the value of your ideas and the process which might transform an idea into a startup, or a startup into a million-dollar business.

Nanci Raphael writes about something all of these authors tend to forget. The barriers. The obstacles. The emotional challenges.

Unfortunately, they are both real and numerous. And without a proper guidebook may obliterate even the best idea and even the most promising startup.

That’s why, “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Mastering the Inner World of Business” dedicates each of its chapters on a separate problem, ranging from doubt and loneliness to stress and tiredness.

You know – the things you can’t plan. But, which will inevitably happen.

#14. “The Entrepreneur Mind: 100 Essential Beliefs, Characteristics, and Habits of Elite Entrepreneurs” by Kevin D. Johnson

The Entrepreneur Mind SummaryBecoming an entrepreneur is not an easy task. It may have to do something with your DNA, but, much more, it has everything with how much dedication and effort you’re planning to offer.

In “The Entrepreneur Mind,” Kevin Johnson, a serial entrepreneur, shares his experiences and knowledge, structuring them into one hundred lessons, divided in seven different areas.

So, prepare to learn 35 new things about strategy, everything from thinking big to having an exit strategy. Then, discover why there’s no point to rush for an MBA, before delving into 13 lessons about the importance of people.

The fourth area is finance (14 lessons), followed by 13 lessons about marketing and sales. You can’t be an entrepreneur without picking up 7 leadership tips. Johnson ends the book with 17 short instructions about motivation.

His final lesson: “you’re an entrepreneur forever.”

#15. “Smarter Faster Better: The Transformative Power of Real Productivity” by Charles Duhigg

Charles DuhiggSmarter Faster Better Summary is a Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter for “The New York Times” and an author of two books on productivity.

Duhigg’s first book, “The Power of Habit,” is probably the more celebrated one. However, “Smarter Faster Better” may be the better choice for entrepreneurs who like to think big. Because, while Duhigg’s debut book concentrates on why we do what we do, this one explores how we can do it better.

Well-researched and brilliantly written, “Smarter Faster Better” explores in-depth eight productivity concepts. In order, these are: motivation, teams, focus, goal setting, managing others, decision making, innovation, and absorbing data.

Even at first glance, many overlap with Johnson’s lessons. As the perfect evidence how essential they are.

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How I got the founder of PayPal, James Altucher and Guy Kawasaki to be my mentors.

some of my mentors - Peter Thiel, James Altucher, Guy Kawasaki

Entrepreneurship can be a hard and lonely game. You have many different alternatives and options to grow your business, but most of them won’t work. You won’t know on which to focus and you are not aware of your lack of knowledge. The tricky business is that you are not always sure of your decisions. Even though these individuals continue with their fantastic performance on a professional level, some of us are keen to know some of their secrets, and “trade routes”.

Before you make any rash decisions why not grow and start thinking big? What does this mean? Well, these guys had insights on what the world needs, the inventiveness derived from this discovery. In other words, you must research, and design alternatives that can take you to the top. What gets you excited when the term business or entrepreneurship is mentioned? All of these things matter because they allude to all aspects of a successful financial endeavor.

Obstacles during this push are common, especially in the early stage. However, your attention must be pointed at long-term benefits and ultimately profits. Do you want to be an inspiration for someone? If so, get prepared for a rough journey with a single goal in mind – to surpass yourself!!

Learn from top-notch mentors, and implement some of their strategies into your business.

This is why it’s crucial to have a group of mentors who can guide your way – so you can learn from their previous experiences – and help you reach new heights.

Continue Reading…

Zero to One Summary – Peter Thiel

Zero To One Summary

MicroSummary: Peter Thiel founded PayPal and was one of the first to invest in Facebook, making him one of the most influential billionaires in Silicon Valley. His unique reasoning for evaluating new business will show you a new perspective on how to set up a startup and be successful. This summary will enable you to know the philosophy and advice of Peter Thiel, which was documented by one of his students (Blake Masters) in a chair at Stanford college. Thiel is today one of the most important investors in the world. This summary will show you that in a startup, going from “0 to 1” is more important than going “from 1 to n”.

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